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Quotes

QUOTE #4 FROM THE NOVEL “PERSUASION” BY JANE AUSTEN

Persuasion is Jane Austen‘s last completed novel.

 

Anne Elliot, a lovely, thoughtful, warm-hearted 19 year old woman, accepted a proposal of marriage from the handsome young naval officer Frederick Wentworth. He was clever, confident, and ambitious, but poor and with no particular family connections to recommend him. Her older friend and mentor, Lady Russell, acting in place of Anne’s late mother, persuaded her to break the engagement.

Now at age 27 and still unmarried, Anne re-encounters her former love. Wentworth is now a captain and wealthy from maritime victories in the Napoleonic wars. However, he has not forgiven Anne for rejecting him.

Here are some of my favourite quotes from the book :

Quote #4: Did Wentworth change his mind about what he said in quote #1?

In the mean while she was in the carriage. He had handed them both in, and placed himself between them; and in this manner, under these circumstances, full of astonishment and emotion to Anne, she quitted Lyme. How the long stage would pass; how it was to affect their manners; what was to be their sort of intercourse, she could not foresee. It was all quite natural, however. He was devoted to Henrietta; always turning towards her; and when he spoke at all, always with the view of supporting her hopes and raising her spirits. In general, his voice and manner were studiously calm. To spare Henrietta from agitation seemed the governing principle. Once only, when she had been grieving over the last ill-judged, ill-fated walk to the Cobb, bitterly lamenting that it ever had been thought of, he burst forth, as if wholly overcome—

“Don’t talk of it, don’t talk of it,” he cried. “Oh God! that I had not given way to her at the fatal moment! Had I done as I ought! But so eager and so resolute! Dear, sweet Louisa!”

Anne wondered whether it ever occurred to him now, to question the justness of his own previous opinion as to the universal felicity and advantage of firmness of character; and whether it might not strike him that, like all other qualities of the mind, it should have its proportions and limits. She thought it could scarcely escape him to feel that a persuadable temper might sometimes be as much in favour of happiness as a very resolute character.

QUOTE #1 FROM THE NOVEL “PERSUASION” BY JANE AUSTEN

QUOTE #2 FROM THE NOVEL “PERSUASION” BY JANE AUSTEN

QUOTE #3 FROM THE NOVEL “PERSUASION” BY JANE AUSTEN

QUOTE #5 FROM THE NOVEL “PERSUASION” BY JANE AUSTEN

 

 

persuasion Jane Austen novel

persuasion Jane Austen novel

 

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